Back from [Where2.0, GoogleDevDay, WhereCamp]

I'm back home from a grueling and invigorating trip to the left-coast to geek on all things 'location'. Unfortunately I got little time to blog myself, but I made lots of notes and am trying to digitize them all. I'll be blogging about some of my own specific announcements that came out at Where2.0 shortly.

Google's Dev Day was in fact the cattle drive I was worried it might be. However, it was still an incredibly fun event because of the hallway track and getting to meet a large number of the Google 'geo' team, as well as various others from other companies.

Apparently I was part of a "geo digerati" party, check out the reciprocal ValleyWag post. Congrats to Ian and the Urban Mapping team.

One of the more mind-boggling things at WhereCamp was Mikel building a mashup into someone else's site. You can now automatically see Google Pano's of Upcoming event locations within Upcoming. I do truly hope that the WebKit party was a blast - looked like it was going to be one based on their pano's.

For the in-depth info, check out all the social sites with the tag wherecamp. For extra geekiness, tags I made use a machine-tag for the specific session. e.g. wherecamp:session=lightningtalks

a couple of highlights off the top of my head:

Many thanks again to Ryan Sarver and Anselm Hook for being awesome coordinators & hosts, and to all the sponsors: Yahoo, O'Reilly, meadan, Google, uLocate/Where.

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About the Author

Andrew Turner is an advocate of open standards and open data. He is actively involved in many organizations developing and supporting open standards, including OpenStreetMap, Open Geospatial Consortium, Open Web Foundation, OSGeo, and the World Wide Web Consortium. He co-founded CrisisCommons, a community of volunteers that, in coordination with government agencies and disaster response groups, build technology tools to help people in need during and after a crisis such as an earthquake, tsunami, tornado, hurricane, flood, or wildfire.